Jennifer K. Adams, PhD

 

Currently I am a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Biology Department at the University of Waterloo.

 

My research links concepts from aquatic ecology, hydrology, and environmental chemistry to improve knowledge of causes and consequences of environmental changes on surface water at northern water-rich landscapes. I employ field- and laboratory-based methods, and use a combination of contemporary and paleolimnological techniques, to generate hydrological, biological and chemical datasets to further our understanding of the effects of human activities and natural processes on aquatic systems. My research spans freshwater systems of Arctic, subarctic, and temperate regions.

Updates & News

Special Issue in Geo now online!

May 18, 2020

The long-awaited special issue in Geo: Geography and Environment is now available online! Check out the outstanding collection of papers in the issue "Aquatic Transitions: Tracking the nature and trajectories of anthropogenically forced change in freshwater and coastal ecosystems".

 

New 'Climate of the Past' paper!

March 17, 2020

Our work on neoglacial diatom dynamics from a small alpine lake in the Qinling Mountains of central China is now published! 

New paper on current and past mercury pollution in the Lake Baikal watershed now out!

February 01, 2020

Our collaborative work on mercury pollution in Lake Baikal, the Selenga Delta, and Selenga River is now published in Environmental Pollution. A collaboration of two closely knit PhD dissertations!

New Position at University of Waterloo

September 03, 2019

I've recently taken up a new post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Biology at the University of Waterloo. I am working with Profs. Roland Hall and Brent Wolfe, co-leading a project in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, Northern Alberta investigating the long-term variability of two major drivers in shallow lake-wetland systems, climate and hydrology. 

New Paper on Diatoms in Siberia out!

April 23, 2019

Our new open access paper is out in Geo: Geography and Environment: "Diatom community responses to long-term multiple stressors at Lake Gusinoye, Siberia".